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Dr. Russell Kern Interviewed for Neuro-Central Feature

Recently, Neuro Central’s Lauren Pulling had the opportunity to interview Russell Kern, PhD, Executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer of the International Stem Cell Corporation (ISCO) that is currently conducting the world’s first-in-human clinical study of neural stem cells in Parkinson’s disease patients and enrolling patients in Melbourne, Australia at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, with their most recent patient being Australian real estate icon, Kevin Weeks.

And with the company already reporting on the promising 6-month results, Dr. Kern’s interview gives us more insight into the field of cell therapy, the challenges he’s faced, and other trials in the pipeline.

In addition to Parkinson’s disease, Dr. Kern explains that the neuroregenerative, neurotrophic and neuro-immunomodulative properties of neural stem cells make it ideal to treat a variety of neurological conditions, including traumatic brain injury. Thus far, the preclinical studies have yielded positive outcomes including improved cognitive performance, locomotion, and neurological function in rodents with traumatic brain injury.

Dr. Kern adds that while it is a consistent battle to find patients who meet the necessary criteria needed to enroll them in the trial, he firmly believes that stem cell therapy has incredible potential and can one day be a standard treatment for Parkinson’s disease.

In closing, Dr. Kern states, “In the next 5–10 years, we would like to see our cell based therapies commercialized and be used as a standard treatment for different neurological indications. A one-time surgical intervention has the potential to significantly improve people’s lives and we are working very diligently to reach that goal and make this treatment available to millions of patients.”

To access the full interview, please click here.

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff at +1-760-940-6383 or ir@intlstemcell.com. Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02452723

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